Director’s Reel




Director Kendy Ty is incredible. I love his style, his stories, his composition, his spin on life. His perspective and his unveiling of this generation’s unspoken stories is so beautiful. So inspired to make my stories come to life via film. I love how you are just immersed into the character’s life, emotions, and their daily thoughts. Beauty. Dark, but beautiful.

I want to make such beautiful pieces.



A Heart-Wrenching Short Film



I’ve discovered a respectable director that I happened to stumble upon, whose works are worthy of mention. His work is so raw, so revealing, and so heart-wrenching. Why do we pretend everything is okay when they are not? Why do we hide negative emotions as if it’s wrong and unworthy of our attention? Life and all its realities surround us. I love how raw this story is. It is but a glimpse of heartache, disappointment, confusion, injustice, and pain. Tragedy. Anger. Beautiful.


The Taboo of Emotions.

Why is it negative to be emotional? 
As if we were meant to be unfeeling creatures, 
Able to process life in commands and do’s and don’t’s 
As if we were to be stiff robots.
To see all things objectively.
To see as one man, one mind. 
As only one type of way.

To think not feel.
Why are emotions taboo? 
As if emotions are a barrier for truth and resolution. 
As if emotions get in the way of healthy friendships and conflict resolution.

Isn’t it what sets us apart from mere animals? 
Or non-living things?
Weren’t our brains made to have emotional capacity, such as heartbreak, hurt, empathy, jealousy, hatred, disappointment, and forgiveness?
Don’t we have the capacity to feel and explore the reality of such things? 

To figure out such things out? 
Why are emotions such taboo? 

What’s wrong with involving emotions in a conflict and express how each other felt?
What’s so wrong about sadness and disappointment? 

Why must we push it aside, sweep it under the rug, hide it in the corners of our minds
And pretend everything is alright.
As if our emotions don’t have anything to do with our welfare. 
As if emotions are the last thing to be cared for on this earth.

Why must we view emotions as such? 

Can’t we deal with them, admit them, and work them out? 
Can’t we express them? 
Is emotion weakness? 
But then why do we feel so much? From such a young age until our old age? 
Why are emotions taboo? 
They should be more revealing of the heart and mind’s condition. 

They should be attended to and healed.
They should be expressed and reconciled.
And then we can be resilient. 

Then we can be heard.

They were made to be acknowledged. 


Post-Analog Generation

It’s funny how the digital world connects us, but makes us feel incredibly lonely at the same time. This juxtaposition has been nabbing at me and getting my attention these days, as I live in the grand technologically connected city of Seoul, with incredibly high-speed 4G LTE wifi almost everywhere, and where most everyone on the bus, subway, streets, and classrooms are looking down on their brightly lit mobile phone screens fully absorbed in the digital lives of others. 

It’s fascinating that this generation is exposed to so much instantly-gratified routines like constant messaging back and forth on Kakao Talk, or checking and uploading clips on Snapchat, and running through all the Instagram notifications of crisp and clean, filtered, hipstered-out photo of coffee cups and blank walls. So interesting how this generation has been so online-focused, and rightly so, as globalization and international markets strive to connect and compete with one another by bridging gaps through virtual data and reports. This information generation has been so exposed to who knows what, and the access to other people’s lives, selfies, blogs, travels, political thoughts, and various opinions has surfaced on the web and shared by countless users per day.

It’s crazy to think even 20 years ago, the invention did not exist nor permeate through society as it does now.

Why am I bringing this up?

Because I find that all lot of young people (including myself) are finding their sense of worth, importance, and identity on the web. More importantly, we are finding our sense of significance by how many followers we have, how many responses we get, and how many “likes” we obtain on a post or photo. God bless the people who really don’t think this way or use social platforms as obsessively to gain a sense of approval, but God also bless those who are bombarded with insecurity and fears as they see their post go unnoticed. 

I think it’s something people don’t like to talk about or admit to, because frankly speaking it is very silly and outrageous to feel less important or valuable because people missed or didn’t give attention to your post, but I think our freedom of expression, thoughts, and feelings are spoken through these platforms and with the sense of vulnerability we feel robbed of significance if no one seems to care. 

However, I do believe this is pandemic more in certain regions, and now that I am back in Seoul, South Korea, the hub of technology and quick everything, I find myself also being on my phone often and checking social media (aka only Facebook because I deleted Instagram) a lot more frequently and with a lot more detail and a lot more judgment and insecurity than I did when I was living in Italy and traveling all throughout Europe. Europeans don’t find that much of their sense of worth online because they are not really online. Yes they are available online but they tend to take social media lightly and engage in normal everyday activities with much love and energy. At least the Italians and those living in Italy. They prefer to be more relaxed, laid back, and incredibly relational and welcoming to foreigners and interested about each individual and what they like and desire. Even in Austria I found so many happy others-focused authentic lifestyles that were fully there in the present. 

In Korea and Eastern Asia, I find more rigid walls, rules of respect, lack of vulnerability, and a whole lot of judgment. I’m sorry if I sound like I am generalizing but I think people who have experienced cross cultural lifestyles and lived in 3 different continents (like myself) are allowed to acknowledge the stark differences and give perspective to others. Throughout it all I’ve found that relationships and authenticity are the most important. And I’m not talking about romantic relationships (which are also important) but friendships and people who you do life with. 

These people should make your lives full of joy, fun, laughter, depth, and stick with you through the tough times and the good times. Your sense of worth and approval and significance should come from God and also backed up by these appreciative loving present people. They should make you feel alive and you should forget that you need to prove yourself online because you are too busy living joyfully and richly in the unplugged world. This is not to say taking photos or videos are bad, I myself am an avid documentarist of everything as a photographer and videographer because I find these moments so precious and fleeting. However, the need to be seen and liked by the digital community and approved of should not be the reason for posts. 

I think it happens to the best of all of us at times, some more than others, but in the end I say this to examine your real life. Do they reflect what you post up and more? Does your everyday life feel more abundant and joyful and deeply connected than your social media posts seem? Or are they but a fleeting non-authentic moment created just for the photo and unsuspecting audience? Does everything come out of s place of abundance and overflow of your real life? Or is it all made up on the spot to feature a life you really don’t have? 


Best Short-Films/Docu’s I’ve Watched

1.BELLAVITA 5-of-5Bella2027248-jason-baffa-bella-vita-film-surf-movie-4BellaVita_MT-6

Bella Vita

Bella Vita is such a beautifully made film. The cinematography and the story-telling is so natural yet so epic. It lurched my heart towards Italy and its culture and loving people again. I must do a surfing excursion with my friends there 🙂

You would think this is a movie just about a typical American surfer going to Italy to catch some waves, but in reality it is a lot about life, enjoying being laid back, exploring Italian culture and their community-oriented lifestyles, being surrounded by incredible people, and doing the things you love to do. The surfing is amazing, and their passion of this sport is incredible, and so relatable, as I’ve surfed several times and felt so incredibly alive and enlightened in life. I loved how they incorporated so much of Italian culture and focused on the local authentic lives of each important person in this film. Man, I was so inspired while watching this film. I miss the Italian culture, the welcoming and hospitable people, the relaxed and loving energy, and the raw authentic away-from-everything kind of feels you get while traveling through Tuscany. The loving and open hearts of the surfers from all over the world was so good to see too, and witnessing the beginnings of this the surf movement Italy was so cool!

I personally lived in Italy for 6 months so seeing all the gorgeous places landscapes of Florence, Pisa, and Venice again was so sweet. My heart was leaping with longing , joy, and even tears as I looked into this person’s beautiful life and the people he was surrounded with. The director Jason Baffa did such an amazing job with the DOP and cinematography. Such a wholesome documentary, I definitely recommend it 🙂 For more info, check out their link!

Bella Vita Film.

The Drop Box

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 9.11.05 PMScreen Shot 2015-10-16 at 9.11.13 PM Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 9.11.19 PM Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 9.11.30 PM

The Drop Box

One of the best documentaries I’ve seen. I literally could not stop crying on the bus as I watched from my iPhone on my commute to school, and at home when I finished up the movie seeing the incredibly sacrificial and caring Pastor Lee exert so much love, faith, and energy on these abandoned unwanted children. This documentary is about how this amazing man finds value in all children, and addresses the problem of baby abandonment by setting up a “baby box” and taking care of the abandoned babies his entire life and seeing them until full health. Korean society shapes so much of the shame and taboo of having a teen pregnancy or having a disabled child which has led so many young mothers give up their babies in this baby box in the dead of night, never wanting to be contacted or seen again. They literally abandon their babies by trashcans and this selfless loving man and pastor finds them and takes them in as his own.

I was so moved by this film, and so moved by Pastor Lee’s heart and endurance through this ministry. It takes his entire life and energy, yet he does it in faith and joy. He is so committed to loving these children, it is unfathomable on his own. We need more people like him in this world. People who care. Not just talk the talk but walk the walk. This is an intense movie, so get ready with tissues in hand. I was so so moved to not just live life for my own desires and dreams, but to live life for others. This young generation is so self-focused and maintaining their happiness, we forget to give back to the community and need people who live out this lifestyle to show us what true unconditional enduring love is.

I totally recommend this movie with all my heart! When you have time, please rent or buy it and watch it. It will change your life! Check out their link below!

The Drop Box Film


Graphic Designs

I am really starting to get into graphic designing and I am very excited to work on new designs!! I just started putting my ideas onto the digital paper, and here’s what I’ve been coming up with! Words of encouragement that I think each one of us needs to be reminded of, including myself 🙂

worthy to be loved-01

I came up with this as I was going through depression and deeply rooted thoughts of worthlessness and unworthiness. As I am overcoming lots of it, I am realizing that people often struggle with this as well while going through depression and anxiety. I was remembering and grieving some moments when people I have loved had treated me with contempt and treated me like I was worthless through their words and actions. In a summary form of what I have been dealing for years: As I was crying with much grief remembering these traumatic abusive moments, I was reminded with a small still voice in my head saying, “Judy, you were still worthy to be loved then.” Which made me cry even more in hysteria, realizing that we should be worthy to be loved, no matter how people treat us. Which turned into a “You are worthy to be loved.” Which led to more tears and realization. Simply put, I think it was God. And I think it’s a truth that’s hard to believe if you didn’t think it growing up. But you better start believing it! Ask anyone around you that cares about you, they will agree.

You are Signficant Yellow-01

I’ve always wanted to use art as a form of encouragement, especially truths that I have learned the hard way, or wished someone would’ve told me at a young age. One being the thought that I am significant. And in turn preaching this message, I tell you that you are also significant.

The objects from this one are from a series of downloadable vectors I found online (thank you and I started changing the positions of the flowers and picking and choosing from various options, and changing the words to be more of importance and meaning. Simply reminding you that you are significant. Don’t forget that you are important and your life is very important. Don’t let this media digital world drown your beautiful meaningful life out in comparison to others. I know in Korea the suicide rate is incredibly high, and the happiness level in this country is incredibly low. Don’t be part of the statistics, and if you are, just know you are significant. Don’t forget it. Hold on to it. Save this and put it as your phone screen saver until it becomes a habit to read and remember. Hold on, dear.

More graphic designing ideas to come and be made! Requests are also okay in the comments, for encouragement (not for your business or profit). Thanks!