“Hey Beautiful” Sweatshirt Photoshoot

Finally got to do a proper photoshoot to showcase my sweatshirt! Thank you Jun Hye for agreeing to model for me, and for being a big advocate for my products and campaign 🙂 Here are parts of the photoshoot! We took them at the Green Cloud Cafe in Hongdae, Seoul. I’m going to publicize this sweatshirt and its sales through various sites soon! So happy with these photos! What a beauty. 😉 The sweatshirt is designed by me, Judy Kim! It was originally for a design class for a promotional campaign fighting against verbal abuse and speaking life. This was to remind those looking that they are beautiful 😉

Etsy Store– these photos look so good with Jun Hye! Looking fabulous 🙂

Daily Boom– Korean store and site, which uses the Electronic Transfer Fund that helps makes payment so much easier in Korea!


Love those shots 🙂 Still learning how to photograph professionally for products and how it looks indoors, without a studio, or if I need to do everything in a studio.These had a warm fun casual look, with a cool artistic cafe backdrop! I like the look of these photos, but I also realize if I want to put out these products on public selling sites I might have to try new things with a clear white studio or make things more commercial-like. Either way, I think I did my part with getting nice shots of the sweatshirt! 🙂 And Jun Hye modelled very well for her first time. I shall call her and her fiancé together once again when I make more couple products 😉

More professional photos:



Love the look! And the WordPress upgrades that makes all these photo collages so lovely. Circles, tiles, squares, mosaics, etc. So cool, I wish I had one of these for my own photos that I can export for other outlets.

It was so awesome working with the lovely Jun Hye Doh! Finally got myself pictures as the artist behind the scenes. Hehe 🙂


A photoshoot success 🙂 YAY.


All photos taken by Judy Kim on a Canon 5 Mark D ii with a 40mm f/2.8 lens. All photos are copyright to Judy Kim Productions.


Post-Analog Generation

It’s funny how the digital world connects us, but makes us feel incredibly lonely at the same time. This juxtaposition has been nabbing at me and getting my attention these days, as I live in the grand technologically connected city of Seoul, with incredibly high-speed 4G LTE wifi almost everywhere, and where most everyone on the bus, subway, streets, and classrooms are looking down on their brightly lit mobile phone screens fully absorbed in the digital lives of others. 

It’s fascinating that this generation is exposed to so much instantly-gratified routines like constant messaging back and forth on Kakao Talk, or checking and uploading clips on Snapchat, and running through all the Instagram notifications of crisp and clean, filtered, hipstered-out photo of coffee cups and blank walls. So interesting how this generation has been so online-focused, and rightly so, as globalization and international markets strive to connect and compete with one another by bridging gaps through virtual data and reports. This information generation has been so exposed to who knows what, and the access to other people’s lives, selfies, blogs, travels, political thoughts, and various opinions has surfaced on the web and shared by countless users per day.

It’s crazy to think even 20 years ago, the dot.com invention did not exist nor permeate through society as it does now.

Why am I bringing this up?

Because I find that all lot of young people (including myself) are finding their sense of worth, importance, and identity on the web. More importantly, we are finding our sense of significance by how many followers we have, how many responses we get, and how many “likes” we obtain on a post or photo. God bless the people who really don’t think this way or use social platforms as obsessively to gain a sense of approval, but God also bless those who are bombarded with insecurity and fears as they see their post go unnoticed. 

I think it’s something people don’t like to talk about or admit to, because frankly speaking it is very silly and outrageous to feel less important or valuable because people missed or didn’t give attention to your post, but I think our freedom of expression, thoughts, and feelings are spoken through these platforms and with the sense of vulnerability we feel robbed of significance if no one seems to care. 

However, I do believe this is pandemic more in certain regions, and now that I am back in Seoul, South Korea, the hub of technology and quick everything, I find myself also being on my phone often and checking social media (aka only Facebook because I deleted Instagram) a lot more frequently and with a lot more detail and a lot more judgment and insecurity than I did when I was living in Italy and traveling all throughout Europe. Europeans don’t find that much of their sense of worth online because they are not really online. Yes they are available online but they tend to take social media lightly and engage in normal everyday activities with much love and energy. At least the Italians and those living in Italy. They prefer to be more relaxed, laid back, and incredibly relational and welcoming to foreigners and interested about each individual and what they like and desire. Even in Austria I found so many happy others-focused authentic lifestyles that were fully there in the present. 

In Korea and Eastern Asia, I find more rigid walls, rules of respect, lack of vulnerability, and a whole lot of judgment. I’m sorry if I sound like I am generalizing but I think people who have experienced cross cultural lifestyles and lived in 3 different continents (like myself) are allowed to acknowledge the stark differences and give perspective to others. Throughout it all I’ve found that relationships and authenticity are the most important. And I’m not talking about romantic relationships (which are also important) but friendships and people who you do life with. 

These people should make your lives full of joy, fun, laughter, depth, and stick with you through the tough times and the good times. Your sense of worth and approval and significance should come from God and also backed up by these appreciative loving present people. They should make you feel alive and you should forget that you need to prove yourself online because you are too busy living joyfully and richly in the unplugged world. This is not to say taking photos or videos are bad, I myself am an avid documentarist of everything as a photographer and videographer because I find these moments so precious and fleeting. However, the need to be seen and liked by the digital community and approved of should not be the reason for posts. 

I think it happens to the best of all of us at times, some more than others, but in the end I say this to examine your real life. Do they reflect what you post up and more? Does your everyday life feel more abundant and joyful and deeply connected than your social media posts seem? Or are they but a fleeting non-authentic moment created just for the photo and unsuspecting audience? Does everything come out of s place of abundance and overflow of your real life? Or is it all made up on the spot to feature a life you really don’t have? 

Seoul Bikers

Who agrees with me that although bike riding is super fun, enjoyable, and adventurous, there are WAY TOO MANY people in Seoul? Ridiculously overcrowded? Yes, we all know that the subways are packed everyday, especially line 2, but man, I didn’t realize how many people walked to streets on the daily. Old halmonis and halabuhjees (Korean grandmas and grandpas) walking with their little carts. It’s actually a little bit cute, unless you’re biking and avoiding 13 consecutive ones at all costs. Or when it’s about that time where all the high school students are dismissed from school and flood the sidewalks in their glasses and uniforms. Oh man, it’s so stressful tryna ring my bell and dodge them all at once.

I’ve been biking to school a couple times a week since I’ve purchased my beautiful new bike. However, the joy of bike riding has been cut short with the numerous people I encounter to the way there! And the sidewalks are pretty bumpy and the roads are so much smoother, but it’s also a lot more dangerous with so many cars. Hmm I’ve discovered that early mornings are better to ride in as opposed to afternoons. I haven’t done much night riding but we shall see. Living in a crowded city like Seoul and riding from business districts to rural areas to hectic Ewha University is quite a challenge. It’s only like a 20 minute ride but I gotta mentally ready myself the night before and the morning of to bike to school. Haha. It’s also cus there’s about a 9-minute uphill part where I sweat like a monkey. Lol.

Anyway, these are my just my observations that can kind of come off as complaining…. I apologize 🙂 Haha.

Basically what I’m saying is that I need to find some sweet spots to bike at, I’m guessing places by Hangang river are really nice and pretty, and really scenic at night. There were some nice ones in Busan as well. But I’m there once finals are over!